About Me

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Mumbai, India
I run an IT Security consulting firm based out of India. We started off from scratch in 2001 when I was 21, and have offices in Mumbai, Bahrain, and UAE. The idea behind the blog is to share the stories of how we run the business, the deals we make, the deals that break, the heartburn, and the sheer joy.

The Ultimate Startup Guide

The Ultimate Startup Guide is an e-book that provides answers to all your questions related to starting and growing a business in India. Everything you wanted to know about entrepreneurship in India from ideation to registration to marketing to hiring. The book contains a large number of practical examples, anecdotes, interviews, and motivational material to help you get started, and to grow rapidly in a booming Indian economy. If you've got the idea, this book will help you through with the execution and realize your dreams. Here are some of the key questions you will find answered in this book:
  • When starting a business, what are the legal issues involved?
  • What form of incorporation is better suited to which type of business?
  • What tax issues are involved?
  • How do I start a business and what are the pitfalls?
  • How do I market my business in the absence of significant funding?
  • How do I get funded?
  • What are the basic accounting concepts I should be aware of?
  • What is a business plan and how should I build one?
The brief table of contents of the book is as follows:
  1. Getting started
  2. Ideation
  3. Forms of Enterprises
  4. Funding
  5. Basic Accounting and Taxation
  6. Import and Export Licensing
  7. Trademark and Patenting
  8. Rules for NRIs and Foreigners
  9. Building a Business Plan
  10. Marketing on a Shoestring
  11. Website and Branding
  12. Women Entrepreneurs
  13. Templates
To order the Ultimate Startup Guide - email me at kkmookhey@gmail.com.

Details of the book are:
Title: The Ultimate Startup Guide
Author: Kanwal Mookhey
Pages: 150
Additional: Companion CD contains numerous templates for building your business plan, calculating cashflow, preparing profit and loss, and balance sheets, preparing invoices, your resume and profile, marketing material, websites, contracts, and many other useful and motivational material.

Sunday, July 16, 2006

Mumbai - resilient or passive

I made a brief three day trip back home, and was immediately overwhelmed with the media coverage of the Mumbai blasts and the aftermath. Mumbai was back to work as usual on the day following the blasts. Thankfully, none of the political parties called for a bandh (strike). And the demonstrations and marches were citizen-led and largely peaceful. The raging debates are whether it is really Mumbai's resilience or rather our immense passivity that resulted in not very visible reactions from civil society. That people came forward as everyday heroes during the time of the blasts to help each other out is undeniable. Senior police officials have been taken to task for hinting strongly that some high-level politicians might be involved. I wouldn't be surprised if that were true, though.

One of the news channels had a debate whether Mumbai had now changed, and whether its spirit was now broken. The most important statement I remember from that entire shrill debate came from Shabana Azmi (actress, social activist, and member of parliament), "It is not about one community against the other. It is about the fundamentalist forces in one community against the moderate voices in their own and the other communities".

What is decidedly different this time around is the seething anger of the common man at the bureaucratic and political apathy and greed with which Mumbai is treated. While the city contributes a third of the country's income tax, its infrastructure is crumbling, and the BMC (Mumbai Municipal Commission) Commissioner is a foolish, corrupt man leading us to further misery. There are mass emails and articles appearing suggesting that Mumbaikars should go on strike in a way that only we can - stop paying any taxes. Personally, I am not sure if that makes any sense. My take would be for Mumbai to secede from the larger land mass. Something along the lines of Hong Kong or Singapore, although we'll never probably reach the economic success levels of those cities.

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